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GET WASTED: WHEN PARTY AND METAL COLLIDE!

Posted on October 17 2019

GET WASTED: WHEN PARTY AND METAL COLLIDE!

 

Metal and punk have been intertwined since their early days. It’s no wonder, considering both have a similar penchant for speed, intensity, and undisputed attitude. Both genres owe a significant debt to the rock ‘n’ roll fury of Motörhead, and since then evolved on separate yet intertwined paths. While bands like Iron Maiden were vocal about their disdain for punk, many of their contemporaries certainly embraced the raw energy punk brought to the table. Bands like Venom and Tank brought speed and the rock sensibilities of punk, with bands like Warfare and Amebix later closing the gap even more between the two genres. On the punk side, bands like Discharge and The Exploited added more metal to their sound, on the edges between blitzkrieg punk attacks and straight up thrash metal. 

Meanwhile, in the United States, thrash was just beginning to emerge as a realized genre at the tail end of the golden era of American hardcore punk, the stateside equivalent of the faster and more aggressive style of punk later recognized as UK ‘82. While the fathers of thrash certainly took plenty of inspiration from punk, it was really the hardcore bands that first made distinguishable crossover records. D.R.I., Suicidal Tendencies, Corrosion Of Conformity, and SST all made the jump to a more thrash-based sound, while newly formed acts like S.O.D. Cryptic Slaughter came from more traditional metal backgrounds. The scene became a perfect storm for fast, angry, and music that spoke to a younger, pissed off generation on the rise in the mid-eighties.

Fast forward twenty years. The thrash revival of the early 2000s is just kicking off, with the same music that spoke to the generation before finding a new audience. Heavily influenced by the American style thrash of the 80’s, it’s no small wonder that crossover would see a mass explosion in popularity as well. One of the bands (if not THE band) that spearheaded this resurgence was Richmond, VA’s Municipal Waste. After a few EP’s and demos, the band released their first full length record, Waste ‘Em All in January of 2003. Comprised of sixteen songs spanning seventeen minutes, the band no time bringing the quick, palm muted thrash attack dripping with intensity and rage back into full swing without losing the fun-spirited nature of punk. Their sophomore record, 2005’s Hazardous Mutation marked a move to slightly longer tracks (still, nothing even gets close to breaking the three minute mark) with a slightly stronger emphasis on the thrash side in the riff department. Clearer, cleaner production came along with the label jump to Earache, solidifying Municipal Waste as reigning champs amongst the full swing of the thrash revival.

2007’s The Art Of Partying would go on to become a crossover record, packed with more of pizza ‘n’ beer, hat brim flipping high-speed thrash than the 80s had songs about Reagan. Touches of to mind amongst tracks like “Lunch Hall Food Brawl” and “Chemically Altered,” and anthems like “The Art Of Partying,” “Headbanger Face Rip,” and album closer “Born To Party” drive home the point that Municipal Waste are in it for a good time. The band would go on to release two more full-lengths, 2009’s Massive Aggressive and 2012’s The Fatal Feast (Waste In Space), before taking a five year break from recording. Returning in 2017 with additional guitarist Nick Poulos, the band released Slime & Punishment (check our awesome leggings here!). With band members doing more crossover style in their newer side project Iron Reagan, it felt as though Municipal Waste was going to stay more firmly in the thrash camp. While they did, they still peppered in plenty of gang vocals and punk into their sound. Tracks like “Breathe Grease” and “Shrednecks” still held plenty of punk fury behind them.


Which brings us to October 2019, and the release of Municipal Waste’s latest EP, The Last Rager. Possibly their most thrash heavy yet, the latest EP features more blistering lead work over the band’s US style thrash. Chock full of attitude and speed, The Last Rager is the band bringing everything they have to the table and condensing it into four songs bursting with beer-soaked, head whipping thrash fit for the pit and the backyard mini ramp alike. Don’t sleep on Municipal Waste, the boys still got it!

The Last Rager. Possibly their most thrash heavy yet, the latest EP features more blistering lead work over the band’s US style thrash. Chock full of attitude and speed, The Last Rager is the band bringing everything they have to the table and condensing it into four songs bursting with beer-soaked, head whipping thrash fit for the pit and the backyard mini ramp alike. Don’t sleep on Municipal Waste, the boys still got it!

 

 

 

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